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Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s 5th Annual

Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer

Scientific Strategies for Discovering and Developing Novel Immunotherapies and Agents to Improve the Efficacy and Toxicology Profiles of T Cell-Targeted Biotherapeutics
August 28-19, 2017 Sheraton Boston Hotel | Boston, MA


Recent regulatory approvals and a succession of favorable clinical data from the checkpoint inhibitor programs of major pharmas are spearheading a new focus on immune system modulating protein therapeutics. However, this space has quickly become crowded with agents directed against similar targets, and issues with non-responders and a limited amount of capacity for clinical studies have created barriers for emerging companies wishing to enter this space. CHI’s Fifth Annual Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer will explore the science and strategies behind developing unique approaches to the unmet medical needs in this market and offer important new updates on mechanistic understandings of efficacy, side effects and patient populations.



Final Agenda

MONDAY, AUGUST 28

7:30 am Registration & Morning Coffee

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Yan Qu, Ph.D., Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer


8:30 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Enabling Effective Immuno-Oncology

Gregory Adams, Ph.D., CSO, Eleven Biotherapeutics

Checkpoint inhibitors and other immune-oncology agents have shown significant promise in the treatment of a variety of cancers. However, many of these agents are only effective when an existing host immune response has already been induced by other therapeutic approaches. I will discuss strategies that may be used to effectively set the stage for immune-oncology treatments including Eleven BioTherapeutics’ Targeted Protein Therapeutics.

9:00 Immunomodulatory Antibodies – Potentiation by Fc Receptor Engagement

Rony Dahan, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Immunomodulatory mAbs are revolutionizing cancer treatment due to their clinical effective stimulation of therapeutic anti-cancer immunity. Recent studies demonstrated the importance of the Fc domain of these types of mAbs. Their optimal activity can be critically depended on their ability to engage defined FcgR pathways. I will discuss our recent characterization of these FcgR-dependent mechanisms, and how they can be exploited for introducing second generation Fc-optimized immunomodulatory mAbs.

9:30 Coffee Break

MECHANISMS OF ACTION

 

10:00 The Role of Metabolism in Immune Response in Tumors: Merging the Past and the Present of Tumor Microenvironment

Allison S. Betof, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Oncology Fellow, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Tumors are not simply collections of cancer cells that arise in a vacuum; they are instead complex structures composed of blood vessels, immune cells, and other supporting structures that interact, consume oxygen and other nutrients, and produce waste. Tumor metabolism has long been viewed as a therapeutic target. I will discuss recent data on how metabolism influences immunobiology and our group’s approach to harness these interactions to improve therapeutic outcomes.

 

10:30 PI3Kgamma Is a Molecular Switch that Controls Immune Suppression

Megan M. Kaneda, Ph.D., Assistant Project Scientist, University of California, San Diego

Macrophages play critical but opposite roles in inflammation and cancer. We have found that the predominant isoform of PI3K in myeloid cells, PI3Kgamma, controls the switch between immune stimulation and immune suppression. Inhibition of macrophage PI3Kgamma activity promotes an immunostimulatory transcriptional program that restores CD8+ T cell activation and cytotoxicity and synergizes with checkpoint inhibitor therapy to promote tumor regression and extend survival in mouse models of cancer.

11:00 Potential Role of NK Cells in Mediating Avelumab (Higg1 Anti-Human PD-L1)’s Anti-Tumor Efficacy and Depletion of Immature Myeloid Cells in Preclinical Models

Yan Qu, Ph.D., Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

Analysis of PD-L1 expression on various immune subpopulations in human patient samples showed that PD-L1 is enriched on non-T cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the percentage of splenic NK cells was increased with WT avelumab treatment but not with the Fc isotype variant. Avelumab-induced tumor shrinkage, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cell increase, and tumor PD-L1+ immature myeloid cell decrease appear to require NK cells, as such changes were abolished upon NK depletion.

ProImmune11:30 Epitope Identification and Clinical Immune Monitoring in Immune Oncology Programs

Emilee Knowlton, Ph.D., Immunology Sales Specialist, ProImmune

12:00 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

12:30 Session Break

TARGET DISCOVERY FOR NEXT GENERATION IMMUNOTHERAPIES

1:25 Chairperson’s Remarks

Michael Schickler, Ph.D., CEO, CureTech, Israel

1:30 Functional Characterization of Macaque Fcr and IgG Subtypes

Margie Ackerman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Engineering, Dartmouth College

A number of antibody therapies rely on Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated effector functions for optimal activity, prompting the need to understand how native and IgG domains engineered to differentially bind to the human receptors translate in non-human primate (NHP) models. We report characterization of the affinity between an IgG Fc variant panel (including subclass, Fc mutants and glycosylation) and major human and rhesus FcR allotypic variants.

2:00 Tri-Targeted Antibody Development

Michael Schickler, Ph.D., CEO, CureTech, Israel

The presentation will discuss the development of a multi-specific mAb targeting tumor cells as well as T and NK cells and its potential additive and synergistic virtues as seen in different clinical studies.

2:30 Discovery and Development Strategies for New Small Molecule Immunotherapies

Nicola Wallis, Ph.D., Senior Director, Biology, Astex Therapeutics, Ltd.

Small molecules are of interest as immunotherapies as both single agent and combinations, offering the possibility of modulating different aspects of the immune system to biologics. We are exploring targeting a number of different immunomodulatory mechanisms with small molecules derived using fragment-based drug design and will describe examples in this presentation.

3:00 Refreshment Break

IMMUNE SYSTEM PRIMING AND ACTIVATION

3:30 STING Adjuvants for Immune System Priming for Antibody Therapy

Stephen_BeersStephen Beers, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom

Successful tumor-targeting antibody approaches appear to rely predominantly on the effector function of Fcγ receptor (FcγR) expressing macrophages. Unfortunately, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are frequently poorly cytotoxic, contribute to immune suppression and have suboptimal FcγR expression making treatment less effective. Here we show that STING agonists are able to overcome immunosuppression in the tumour microenvironment effectively reversing the TAM inhibitory FcγR profile and provided strong adjuvant effects to antibody therapy.

4:00 Next-Generation Cancer Vaccines

Daniel L. Levey, Ph.D., Senior Director, Vaccine Research, Agenus

Agenus is advancing two fully synthetic cancer vaccine platforms. The first is based on identification of mutations encoded in the tumor genome while the second relates to a novel class of tumor specific neo-epitopes arising from inappropriate phosphorylation of various proteins in malignant cells. The platforms support the manufacture of both individualized and off-the-shelf cancer vaccines against a range of tumor antigens, increasing the likelihood of immune recognition of tumors.

4:30 Oral T Cell Vaccines Targeting Immune Organs of the Gut for Generating Systemic Antigen Specific T Cells

Marc Mansour, Ph.D., Chief Business Officer, Vaximm AG

We use attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21 as a vector to deliver a plasmid encoding antigens of interest via the oral route to Peyer’s patches. The bacteria have built in adjuvant properties and induce cross presentation to produce a systemic T cell response. Monotherapy with a candidate targeting VEGFR2 produced clinical responses in GBM, highlighting the unique properties of this T cell vaccine approach.

5:00 End of Day

TUESDAY, AUGUST 29

7:25 am Breakout Discussion Groups with Continental Breakfast

 

NON-RESPONDERS, SIDE EFFECTS AND TOXICOLOGY

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Adam J. Adler, Ph.D., Professor, Immunology, University of Connecticut

8:30 Systematic Approaches to Identifying and Overcoming Resistance to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Benjamin Izar, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Oncology Fellow, BIDMC and Center for Cancer Precision Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Broad Institute

Resolving mechanisms of resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) may provide novel avenues for the development of therapies. Although we have begun to gain insight into these mechanisms, the complexity of tumor-immune cell interactions and technical challenges, limit a systematic assessment of resistance mechanisms. I will discuss experimental platforms that may enable such systematic interrogations.

9:00 Tumor and Class-Specific Patterns of Immune-Related Adverse Events of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A Systematic Review

Aaron Hansen, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto; Medical Oncologist, Princess Margaret Cancer Center

Through a systematic review, we identified distinct immune related adverse event (irAE) profiles based on tumor type and immune checkpoint inhibitor class (CTLA-4 and PD-1). CTLA-4 inhibitors have a higher frequency of grade 3/4 irAEs. Furthermore, for patients treated with PD-1 inhibitors, those with melanoma had a higher frequency of gastrointestinal and skin irAEs, and lower rate of pneumonitis compared with patients with NSCLC and RCC. Different immune microenvironments may drive histology-specific irAE patterns.

PROTEIN ENGINEERING

9:30 Combination Therapy with PD-1 Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Potency of T Cells Redirected by Novel Bispecific Antibodies

Ken Chang, Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Development, Immunomedics

Novel bispecific antibodies that bind bivalently to tumor antigens and monovalently to CD3 can redirect T cells to kill Trop-2- or CEACAM5-expressing solid cancer cells grown in monolayer cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The antitumor efficacy was demonstrated also in a humanized mouse model and in 3D spheroids generated with cells from TNBC and colonic cancers. Combining anti-PD-1 increased cell death in 3D spheroids and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals.

MaxCyte no tagline10:00 Presentation to be Announced

10:30 Grand Opening Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

11:15 A Novel, Dual-Specific Antibody Conjugate Targeting CD134 and CD137 Costimulates T Cells and Elicits Antitumor Immunity

Adam J. Adler, Ph.D., Professor, Immunology, University of Connecticut

Combining agonists to different costimulatory receptors can be more effective in controlling tumors compared to individual agonists, but presents logistical challenges and increases the potential for adverse events. We developed a novel immunotherapeutic agent by fusing agonists to CD134 and CD137 into a single biologic, OrthomAb, that potentiates cytokine secretion from TCR-stimulated T cells more potently than non-conjugated CD134 + CD137 agonists in vitro, and reduces tumor growth in vivo.

11:45 Agonist Redirected Checkpoint, PD1/OX40L, for Cancer Immunotherapy

Taylor Schreiber, M.D., Ph.D., CSO, Shattuck Labs, Inc.

This talk will outline the development and characterization of both mouse and human PD1/OX40L bi-functional fusion proteins. Head-to-head studies demonstrate that this molecule significantly outperforms PD1/OX40 antibody controls in all pre-clinical tumor models tested.

12:15 pm Close of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer


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